MRSA

MRSA

Table of Contents

This is an acronym, signifying Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus. It is also known as the ‘superbug'. Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic organisms has become one of the largest threats to human health, in recent years. It has been the cause of many deaths in hospitals. On the BMJ's ‘Clinical Evidence' website, in June 2007, was the headline: “Antibiotic resistant microbes biggest threat to European health” *. This puts MRSA in context. The use of homeopathy in farm animals, pets and humans completely avoids this risk.

MRSA is classified as a zoonosis, meaning a disease transmissible to man from animals. The presence of this organism in farmed food animals is a frightening development. The subject is inextricably linked to that of antibiotic usage on farms which, unlike homeopathy, has the capability of inducing antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria.

Although we have thankfully never had to put it to the test, homeopathy ought to be able to help in cases of MRSA in animals.

*Antibiotic resistant microbes biggest threat to European health

BMJ 2007; 334 doi: 10.1136/bmj.39237.646655.DB (Published 7 June 2007)

Cite this as: BMJ 2007;334:1187.2