FAQ Euthanasia

Frequently Asked Questions

Euthanasia

See also: Euthanasia.pdf

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It is hoped that these few Q & A examples will help when things draw near to the end for your pet.

Q. How can I tell when my animal should be ‘put down’?

A. This is a very good question and a very important one. There is probably no absolutely correct answer. In general, we believe that if an animal is participating in life and appears to be enjoying aspects of life, then it is not ready to go. It is important that an animal should be allowed to maintain dignity. There are species differences. Dogs and cats can probably order their affairs so that the end comes naturally and gently, at a chosen moment, so long as they are fed through life on natural foods and have not been subjected to a lot of drug treatment or vaccination. This is less clear for herbivores like cattle and horses, who would be dealt with by predators, in the wild, when less able to keep up with the herd. It is more likely that you will have to intervene for horses, cattle, sheep, goats, donkeys etc. than with dogs and cats. However, there are occasions when even cats and dogs cannot find their own way out, despite life having become a real burden. When to intervene, in such circumstances, is a very difficult matter but usually it is clear that the sparkle in the eyes has dimmed and that the zest for life has gone.

Q. Can animals die naturally, without cruelty?

A. In many cases, particularly with cats and dogs, this can be possible. After all, death is as natural as birth. However, an unnatural lifestyle can lead to this natural mechanism functioning less well (e.g. lack of a suitable natural diet through life and the influence of frequent or persistent drug treatment and over-vaccination). Each case must be assessed own its own circumstances. We must try to preserve dignity and welfare, balanced with the fact that we should think very carefully before taking a life prematurely.

See also: Euthanasia.pdf

If you have questions not answered here, please let us know (contact details)

Back to main FAQ